Students discover possible learning styles

Students+of+business+teacher+Lindsay+Hart%27s+PRIDE+Time+complete+a+Learning+Styles+quiz+on+Xello+on+Oct.+21.

Emry Lundy

Students of business teacher Lindsay Hart’s PRIDE Time complete a Learning Styles quiz on Xello on Oct. 21.

On Wednesday, Oct. 21, students spent their PRIDE Time navigating and completing Xello requirements for the second time.

During the first use of Xello, students completed a Matchmaker quiz, took a personality quiz and then spent time looking through their suggested careers and schools.

The Oct. 21 visit, however, was oriented toward learning styles. Student answered 20 questions about how they learn and do certain tasks. At the end of the quiz, Xello revealed the students’ percentages of each of the learning styles. The three learning styles were visual, auditory and tactile.

After giving the percentages, Xello explained what each one was and gave tips on what students of that learning style could do to increase their learning experience.

Visual learners like to learn through reading and looking at diagrams instead of listening to a teacher talk. Tips for students in the visual learning category are to make flash cards, highlight important pieces in the notes and to visualize information as you hear it.

Auditory learners learn far easier when there is some form of discussion taking place. They tend to enjoy reading aloud or repeating facts for memorization. Xello encouraged visual learners to “try talking to yourself when problem solving” and “find a partner who can read questions out for you to answer” when attempting to study or learn facts.

Tactile learners prefer hands-on experience. Methods of learning aimed towards tactile learners include taking breaks for exercise, rewriting notes and making models, diagrams and flash cards.

“I got audio-visual learner,” sophomore Seth Tripp said. “I do think I am a mix of all three, but audio-visual is definitely my strong suit.”

After students found out their learning style percentages, they spent more time exploring possible careers, schools and majors tailored to their wants and interests.